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Boat Ramp Location

carters lake damsite ramp location map

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Fishing Trips: What to Expect

 


Trip Hours

hoursEach trip will vary as far as how long we're on the water. Here's a basic layout of what to expect.

SUMMER TRIPS will only last 4.5 to 5.5 hours on average. The heat of course plays into this, as well as the bite. An average Summer trip between late-May through August we'll boat 20+ fish by lunch and by mid-day the fish slow way down so if we've caught a lot of fish then we usually call it a day.  REMEMBER: ALL SPOTTED BASS ARE 100% CATCH AND RELEASE

WINTER TRIPS will last from 7-8+ hours on average. The fish tend to bite a bit slower, although 30+ fish days are not uncommon. An average winter trip we boat from 15-20 fish. Winter is possibly the best time to catch a true trophy sized fish. Lots of giant fish caught during Winter time. Spring and Fall varies as well. When you contact me to set up your trip always ask what hours I expect us to fish and I'll always give you an accurate timeframe, and what to expect.


Fishing License

fishing license

First and foremost, you must have a valid Georgia Fishing license. NO LICENSE = NO FISHING. But don't worry, they're cheap and easy to get. For more information on Georgia Fishing licenses, please visit the Georgia DNR web site.


Bait Trips

spottail minnows

I run bait trips 12 months a year (but not every trip). In warmer months, I can usually net bait for our trip in the wee hours before you get there.

However, in the winter I will use fingerling trout as bait. Trout are excellent bait, but they can be as much as $2 a piece. When you're buying one or two dozen at a time, day after day, this can really add up. I have no choice but to tack on a surcharge for trips where we are using trout. I'll let you know what the up-charge is prior to the trip.

Rods, Reels, and Tackle

baitcaster

I provide all the gear you need for catching fish. However, if you would like to bring your own gear, give me a call ahead of time and I’ll give you my recommendations for rod length, line type/strength, etc… There is no sense in bringing a lot of your own gear since I will have what you need for that day, and I’d like to keep the boat as clutter free as possible. But again, you’re more than welcome to bring your own stuff, especially if you fish left handed, since most of my gear is for right handed people.


Dress Appropriately

winter big bass

We’re going to be outside all day and at the mercy of the elements. Sometimes it is blisteringly hot, sometimes bitter cold, rain is always a possibility, so check the weather ahead of time and dress for whatever is forecast to come our way. Generally, it is cooler in the morning than people think, particularly in the spring, fall, and winter, and when we’re running between places on the boat, the wind blast can be VERY cold.

The humidity around the lake makes heat feel hotter, cold feel colder, and can make you miserable in a hurry if you aren’t prepared. I have lockers on the boat to stow your jackets and whatever, so you can concentrate on fishing and not have to worry about something going overboard.


Food/Drinks

Typically I will have iced drinks on the boat, mostly water but sometimes sodas and sports drinks. If you’re doing a half-day trip, I’d say you don’t need to bring anything. If you’re doing a full-day, bringing some snacks might help keep your energy up. Standing on a rocking boat in the sun can wear you out more than you think, especially in the hot months. We can also take a break during the day if you need. There is a restaurant nearby where we can grab a burger and some drinks, so just come on. I’ll take care of you.

Sunscreen

Just being in the sun can be hard on your skin, but when you’re near the water, light reflects off the surface and magnifies the amount of light hitting your skin. Even if it is overcast, I recommend that you bring some sunscreen. You can get baked in a hurry if you aren’t careful.

Cameras

Worried about bringing a nice camera around slimy fish, lots of water, and the potential for rain? –don’t be. Mostly people regret not bringing a camera, and we’ll make sure it is taken care of. If we get rain, we can stow your camera in a locker and move to a boathouse for pics. And we can get someone with dry hands to snap the photo. Sometimes I will have a camera on board, but I’m usually trying to get you on fish, not taking pics, so its best if you bring your own and capture your own memories.


Ramp Location

If we are fishing on Carter's Lake, we will launch from the Damsite Ramp unless there is some reason to go elsewhere. Click here for the location of this ramp.

Keeping Fish

bluegill in coolerSpotted bass are 100% catch-and-release. The only exceptions I make are for kids that want to skin-mount their first trophy fish. For you grown-ups, if you catch a trophy spot and want a mount for your wall, we will take measurements and pictures and you can get a fiberglass mount from most taxidermists. Fiberglass mounts can be incredibly realistic, and we'll all feel better that the big fish is alive for someone else to enjoy.

Walleye on the other hand are 100% catch-and-eat. If you don't take it home with you, I will. Those things are about the tastiest fish you'll ever eat!

I prefer if you didn't take home other bass species: largemouth, striper, hybrids, etc... If everyone took fish home to eat or mount, I'd be out of business--Carter's just isn't a very large lake!

If you want meat for the table, we can fish for catfish or panfish.

louie bartenfield fishing cartoon